Trump initially resisted the legislation, which would prevent him from unilaterally easing penalties against Moscow in the future - effectively placing him under Congress' watch.
Trump initially resisted the legislation, which would prevent him from unilaterally easing penalties against Moscow in the future - effectively placing him under Congress' watch.

The White House has indicated that President Donald Trump would sign a sweeping Russia sanctions measure that requires him to get Congress' permission before lifting or easing the economic penalties against Moscow.

The House was scheduled to consider the sanctions package as early as Tuesday, and the bill could be sent to Trump before Congress breaks for the August recess. The legislation is aimed at punishing Moscow for meddling in the presidential election and its military aggression in Ukraine and Syria.

Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the newly appointed White House press secretary, said Sunday that the administration is supportive of being tough on Russia and "particularly putting these sanctions in place."

"We support where the legislation is now, and will continue to work with the House and Senate to put those tough sanctions in place on Russia until the situation in Ukraine is fully resolved," Sanders said on ABC's "This Week."

Congressional Republicans and Democrats announced on Saturday that they'd settled lingering issues with the bill, which also includes stiff economic penalties against Iran and North Korea. The sanctions targeting Russia, however, have drawn the most attention due to Trump's persistent push for warmer relations with President Vladimir Putin and ongoing investigations into Russia's interference in the 2016 campaign.

TRT World 's Jon Brain has more from Washington.

Kushner makes rare public statement

The vote comes as Trump's son-in-law, Jared Kushner, emerged from behind the scenes to tell Senate investigators he had no part in any Kremlin attempt to meddle in the US election despite having met Russians four times last year.

"All of my actions were proper and occurred in the normal course of events of a very unique campaign," Kushner later told reporters outside the White House. "I did not collude with Russia, nor do I know of anyone else in the campaign who did."

Kushner, 36, a senior White House adviser, met Senate Intelligence Committee staff behind closed doors for about two hours. Two sources with knowledge of what Kushner told them said the session was pleasant and conversational.

In an 11-page written statement Kushner made public before the meeting, the real estate businessman portrayed himself as new to politics when he became a top adviser to Trump's 2016 campaign. The letter was his fullest account to date of contacts with Russian officials.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies