Survivors of the Japanese attack on the US naval base in Hawaii find it difficult to speak about the events of December 7, 1941.

Bill Hughes, who was aboard the USS Utah when it was attacked, arrives at a ceremony honouring the sailors at the memorial on Ford Island at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii, December 6, 2016.
Bill Hughes, who was aboard the USS Utah when it was attacked, arrives at a ceremony honouring the sailors at the memorial on Ford Island at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii, December 6, 2016.

American veterans and their families on this date observe the 75th anniversary of the surprise attack that brought the country into World War II, when the Japanese navy struck air and naval bases at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, a US territory at the time.

Hundreds of Japanese bombers flew low over Honolulu on the morning of December 7, 1941 targeting ships and an airfield. More than 2,400 soldiers, sailors, and civilians were killed. Shortly after, President Franklin D. Roosevelt said the day of the attack would be "a date which will live in infamy."

The United States joined World War ll after Japan attacked the US fleet, moored at Naval Station Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, on December 7, 1941. (File Photo: Reuters)
The United States joined World War ll after Japan attacked the US fleet, moored at Naval Station Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, on December 7, 1941. (File Photo: Reuters)

The bombing brought the Unites States into World War ll, which ended with the eventual defeat of Japan and its allies.

After 75 years, survivors of the attack still find it difficult to speak about what they saw.

TRT World's Tetiana Anderson has this report from Hawaii.

Source: TRT World