The success of bike-sharing is now attracting bigger companies like Uber and Careem.
The success of bike-sharing is now attracting bigger companies like Uber and Careem.

Karachi, Pakistan's main port and economic heart, is one of the most congested cities in the world. Its population has mushroomed by more than four percent a year since 1998 and the Asian Development Bank (ADB) says the numbers are expected to rise from over 20 million to 31 million by 2030.

Car and motorbike ownership are booming as the city's wealth grows, bringing longer traffic jams. And with the public transport unreliable, people are spending a lot of time and money trying to get around, something which has helped big ride-sharing services such as Uber and Careem gain a foothold across major cities in Pakistan.

There is also a new, two-wheeled entrant in the ride-sharing market, Bykea. It is tapping into the large number of motorbikes already on the road, and putting commuters in the fast lane.

"There are about 15 million bikes in Pakistan, there are about 30 million smartphone users in Pakistan," says Rafiq Malik, the CEO of Bykea.

"Essentially, we offer them (bike owners) an opportunity to utilise an asset that they already own which is a motorbike, to earn either an income or a secondary income," Malik says.

TRT World's Mobin Nasir explains how the service works.

Source: TRT World