A snap elections has been called following the impeachment of Park Geun-hye in March over her involvement in one of the country's biggest corruption and influence-peddling scandals.

Moon Jae-in, the presidential candidate of the Democratic Party of Korea, is greeted by his supporters during his election campaign rally in Goyang, South Korea, May 4, 2017.
Moon Jae-in, the presidential candidate of the Democratic Party of Korea, is greeted by his supporters during his election campaign rally in Goyang, South Korea, May 4, 2017.

South Korea is all set to hold its presidential elections on May 9 to elect a new leader.

The snap elections were called following the ousting of Park Geun-hye in March, after her impeachment over one of the country's biggest corruption and influence-peddling scandals.

The corruption charges against Park prompted millions of South Koreans to take to the streets calling for her to be ousted.

She is now detained and awaiting trial for charges including abuse of power and bribery.

The scandal exposed close ties between politics and business and is one of the main reasons South Korea could see a change in its ruling party.

As TRT World's Joseph Kim reports, many voters are turning to liberal candidates who have promised reform.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies