Prosecutors sent two thousand audio recordings to the Constitutional Court seeking impeachment of President Park Geun-hye.

South Korean judges attend a hearing on whether to confirm the impeachment of President Park Geun-hye, at the Constitutional Court, in Seoul, December 22, 2016.
South Korean judges attend a hearing on whether to confirm the impeachment of President Park Geun-hye, at the Constitutional Court, in Seoul, December 22, 2016.

South Korea's Constitutional Court is holding a hearing on whether to confirm the impeachment of President Park Geun-hye.

Park was impeached by the parliament on December 9, 2016 after accusations that she colluded with her long-time friend, Choi Soon-sil to pressure big businesses to donate to two foundations set up to back the president's policy initiatives.

The court has accepted two thousand audio files for the hearing on whether to confirm the impeachment of the president.

But Park's team hopes that the tapes submitted by prosecutors may prove her innocence.

TRT World's spoke to Seoul-based journalist Adam Reed for more details.

If not , Park would be South Korea's first elected leader to be forced from office.

Senior government aides and top corporate executives, including the head of Electronics giant Samsung, have allegedly been involved in the scandal.

South Korean special prosecutor's office on Monday questioned Samsung Group chief Jay Y. Lee for more than 15 hours.

On Wednesday, the office will decide whether to request an arrest warrant for Lee.

He is accused of pledging 43 billion won ($36 million) to a company and organisations backed by Park's confidant, Choi to win support for a 2015 merger of two Samsung affiliates.

The office will also decide at the same time on whether to seek arrest warrants for four other Samsung Group executives identified as suspects in its investigation.

Park, Lee, Choi, and the Samsung Group have all denied bribery accusations.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies