Italy sits on two fault lines, making it one of the most seismically active countries in Europe. Sunday's quake damaged St. Benedict's Cathedral in the ancient city of Norcia in central Italy, October 31, 2016.
Italy sits on two fault lines, making it one of the most seismically active countries in Europe. Sunday's quake damaged St. Benedict's Cathedral in the ancient city of Norcia in central Italy, October 31, 2016.

A 5.0 magnitude earthquake rocked central Italy on Thursday morning, in the same region that was struck by recent strong quakes, the US Geological Survey (USGS), said.

Two quakes measuring 5.5 and 6.1 struck the area on October 26, followed by a 6.6 magnitude earthquake on Sunday, the biggest temblor to strike Italy for 36 years. In August, a 6.2 earthquake in the same region killed nearly 300 people.

The USGS said that Thursday's quake was very shallow, only 10 kilometres (6.2 miles) deep, and was centred 51.5 km (32 miles) southeast of Perugia.

The shallow depth would have intensified the shaking at the surface.

A 5.0 magnitude earthquake is considered moderate and is capable of causing considerable damage.

However, local media said no fresh collapses or emergencies had been reported.

Sunday's 6.6 magnitude earthquake unleashed widespread damage, levelling historic towns and villages in the Apennine mountains and displacing 15,000 people.

Saint Anthony church partially collapsed following an earthquake along the road to Norcia, Italy, October 30, 2016. (Reuters)
Saint Anthony church partially collapsed following an earthquake along the road to Norcia, Italy, October 30, 2016. (Reuters)

Italy sits on two fault lines, making it one of the most seismically active countries in Europe.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies