Rotterdam was once known for welcoming newcomers, but the rise of the Dutch far-right is making life there more difficult for foreigners.

Riot police use dogs to remove demonstrators outside the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam, Netherlands, March 12, 2017.
Riot police use dogs to remove demonstrators outside the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam, Netherlands, March 12, 2017.

Rotterdam is the second largest city in the Netherlands, as well as its most diverse. But lately, anti-immigrant rhetoric from far-right Dutch politicians has had an impact on its Muslim community.

Musa and Rabia Yigit were born and raised in Turkey, but now reside in Rotterdam. They say discrimination is making it difficult to call the city home.

"While I was studying, I found an internship, but they did not accept me because I was wearing a headscarf. So I applied for a job at another company. I was the only foreigner there. And even though they hired me, they made me feel alienated," Rabia said.

TRT World's Kilmeny Duchardt reports.

Source: TRT World