The cause of the Grenfell Tower fire will take weeks if not months to determine. It has raised questions about the safety of hundreds of similar buildings and what to do with people living in them.

The Grenfell Tower tragedy is triggering debates about social housing, the divide between rich and poor, and the failure of authorities to respond to the concerns of ordinary people.
The Grenfell Tower tragedy is triggering debates about social housing, the divide between rich and poor, and the failure of authorities to respond to the concerns of ordinary people.

Hundreds of people have taken to the streets of central London to demand more help for those affected by the tower block fire tragedy.

Earlier, dozens of people stormed the town hall building in the London's Kensington district where the tragedy was being discussed.

At least 30 people have now been confirmed as having died in the fire which tore through the 24-storey apartment block. Some 70 residents remain unaccounted for.

Local authorities have warned that the death toll is certain to rise and that some of the victims may never be identified.

Syrian refugee Mohammed Al Haj Ali is one of the first identified victims. His two brothers are inconsolable.

"I called him and said: 'Where are you?', I said: 'Where are you?' He said: 'I'm in the flat.' I said: 'Why you didn't come? They brought us outside. I thought you are with us'," Omar Al Haj Ali, the victim's brother explained.

"He said 'no one brought me outside', he said, 'why (have) you left me?'" Omar adds, weeping.

"I thought they took him outside with me. They didn't. They left him."

TRT World's Simon McGregor-Wood reports with more from London.

Source: TRT World