German Chancellor Angela Merkel says that Berlin will try to stay on good terms with Washington, London and Moscow, but underlines that Germany would have to "fight for [its] own destiny."

Chancellor Merkel, who has been in power since 2005, made the statement at an election rally in Munich.
Chancellor Merkel, who has been in power since 2005, made the statement at an election rally in Munich.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel underlined that Germany would try to stay on good terms with Washington, London and "even Moscow", and emphasised the importance of warm relations with France.

Europe "must take its fate into its own hands" faced with a western alliance divided by Brexit and Donald Trump's presidency, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Sunday.

"The times in which we could completely depend on others are on the way out. I've experienced that in the last few days," Merkel told a crowd at an election rally in Munich, southern Germany.

We Europeans truly have to take our fate into our own hands.

While Germany and Europe would strive to remain on good terms with America and Britain, "we have to fight for our own destiny", Merkel went on.

"Special emphasis was needed on warm relations between Berlin and newly-elected French President Emmanuel Macron," she added.

TRT World spoke to journalist David Charter in Berlin about the significance of her statement.

The Trump factor

The chancellor had just returned from a G7 summit which wound up on Saturday without a deal between the US and the other six major advanced nations on upholding the 2015 Paris climate accords.

Merkel on Saturday labelled the result of the "six against one" discussion "very difficult, not to say very unsatisfactory".

Trump offered a more positive assessment on Twitter Sunday, writing: "Just returned from Europe. Trip was a great success for America. Hard work but big results!"

The US president had earlier tweeted that he would reveal whether or not the US would stick to the global emissions deal -- which he pledged to jettison on the campaign trail — only next week.

On a previous leg of his first trip abroad as president, Trump had repeated past criticism of NATO allies for failing to meet the defensive alliance's military spending commitment of two percent of GDP.

Observers noted that he neglected to publicly endorse the pact's Article Five, which guarantees that member countries will aid the others they are attacked.

The omission was especially striking as he unveiled a memorial to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks against the US, the only time the mutual defence clause has been triggered.

Trump also reportedly described German trade practices as "bad, very bad," in Brussels talks last week, complaining that Europe's largest economy sells too many cars to the US.

Sunday's event saw Merkel renew bonds with the Christian Social Union (CSU), Bavarian sister party to her own centre-right Christian Democratic Union (CDU), ahead of a parliamentary vote in September.

Polls show the chancellor, in power since 2005, on course to be re-elected for a fourth term.

Source: TRT World