The people of St Petersburg have been united by their sorrow, but underneath their pain lies a resilience in the face of an unspeakable act.

People hold flowers as they mourn for the victims of a blast in St. Petersburg metro at Tekhnologicheskiy institut metro station in St. Petersburg, Russia, April 4, 2017.
People hold flowers as they mourn for the victims of a blast in St. Petersburg metro at Tekhnologicheskiy institut metro station in St. Petersburg, Russia, April 4, 2017.

The number of fatalities from the bomb attack on a metro in the Russian city of St Petersburg has risen to 14. Another 49 people are still in hospital.

The authorities have identified a 22-year-old Russian citizen born in Kyrgyzstan as the main suspect.

One survivor, Alexandra Zablitskaya, recalls the attack that left her and her grandmother hospitalised.

"I heard the explosion and then the lights fell apart and it went dark. There were all these unpleasant smells and I was shouting. I could feel on my cheek something burning and I managed to hide behind my grandmother," she said.

But many of the victims never made it out of the metro station, while others were seriously injured.

TRT World's Polina Yayikova reports.

Source: TRT World