Volcanologists track Mount Etna’s activity

Researchers use new technology to track the causes and consequences of the latest eruptions on Europe's most active volcano.

Photo by: Reuters
Photo by: Reuters

Etna, the highest volcano in mainland Europe at 3,330 metres, sprung to life on February 28.

Updated Mar 28, 2017

Volcanologists seek to track the causes and consequences of Mount Etna’s activity following a series of violent eruptions.

Etna, the highest volcano in mainland Europe at 3,330 metres, was largely dormant for the last two years but it sprung to life on February 28.

Researchers are using drones, thermal imaging cameras and GPS devices to study the changes on Sicily's Mount Etna. Volcanologist Emanuela De Beni said the results and new imagery would also be used for a 3D construction of Etna.

On March 16, ten people were injured in a volcanic explosion. The last major eruption was in 1992.

TRT World's Sourav Roy reports.

Source: 
TRTWorld and agencies