Mass protests in Latin America condemn violence against women

These protests were held on the United Nation's International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.

Photo by: AFP
Photo by: AFP

Some 200 women have been killed by their partners or ex-partners so far this year in Argentina alone.

Mass protests were held across Latin America on Friday to condemn violence against women.

Tens of thousands of demonstrators took to the streets in Buenos Aires, the latest in a series of massive protests organised by a burgeoning movement against domestic violence against women.

Some 200 women have been killed by their partners or ex-partners so far this year in Argentina, fuelling widespread condemnation.

"If any of you are going through what I was, please go to a loved one, a neighbour, anyone," said an online message from Chilean victim Nabila Riffo, 28, who lost both eyes when her ex-boyfriend attacked her in May.

"Please, don't be intimidated or threatened by any man," she said.


Activists march during the commemoration of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women in Buenos Aires on November 25, 2016. Source: AFP

Marches were also held in Chile, Uruguay, Colombia, Venezuela and Guatemala, with another planned Saturday in Peru.

The Argentine protesters called for further action, including a worldwide "women's strike" on March 8, International Women's Day.

Activists in Germany, Italy, Russia, Israel, South Korea and Mexico have joined the strike plan, organisers said.

World observes international day

The demos were held on the United Nation's International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.

“Violence against women and girls imposes large-scale costs on families, communities and economies,” UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said in his message on the occasion.

Ban explained that when women cannot work as a result of violence, their employment could be put at risk, jeopardising much-needed income, autonomy and their ability to leave abusive relationships.

“The world cannot afford to pay this price. Women and girls cannot afford it – and should not have to,” he said.

“Yet such violence persists every day, around the world.”

On Friday, the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) also kicked off a series of events, including media roundtables, theatre performances and storytelling competitions and other advocacy activities, to raise awareness of the issue and provoke action to end all forms of violence against women.

“It is essential that Afghan women and girls can fully exercise their freedom and contribute to the building of the nation, without the threat of physical harm,” said Pernille Kardel, the Secretary-General’s Deputy Special Representative for Afghanistan and acting head of UNAMA.

Source: 
TRTWorld and agencies