Last week's clashes at the compound left two Israelis and three Palestinians dead. The authorities have urged all Muslim worshippers to gather outside Al Aqsa Mosque for Friday prayers.

Israeli police officers detain a Palestinian man outside the Lion's Gate, following an appeal from clerics to pray in the streets instead of the Al Aqsa Mosque compound, in Jerusalem's Old City, Wednesday, July 19, 2017.
Israeli police officers detain a Palestinian man outside the Lion's Gate, following an appeal from clerics to pray in the streets instead of the Al Aqsa Mosque compound, in Jerusalem's Old City, Wednesday, July 19, 2017.

Israel tightened its grip on one of Jerusalem's holiest and most sensitive sites after the incident last Friday.

Three Israeli-Palestinians were killed in a shoot-out with Israeli police. And two of these policemen later died of their injuries.

It was one of the most serious incidents in Occupied East Jerusalem in recent years.And as expected, it once again exposed tensions between Israelis and Palestinians.

Under the status quo, Muslims are given religious control over the compound and Jews are allowed to visit but not pray.

TRT World's Rahul Radhakrishnan reports.

Israel denies it's trying to change that status quo, but Palestinians don't believe it. With the installation of metal detectors at the gates following last week's incident, that mistrust has led to daily confrontations.

Source: TRT World