Iraqi parliament unanimously adopts resolution over the killings of Turkmen. Meanwhile, Mosul residents displaced by fighting or accused of participating in Daesh's operations say they fear revenge attacks by Iraqi forces.

HRW says the civilians are being subjected to detention camps by Iraqi forces rather than being protected.
HRW says the civilians are being subjected to detention camps by Iraqi forces rather than being protected.

Iraqi parliament on Thursday adopted a resolution declaring the killings of Turkmen by Daesh terrorists as a "massacre".

Turkmen lawmaker Niyaz Nimaroglu said that the resolution was unanimously approved by the parliament.

In June 2014, Daesh captured Tal Afar - located around 80km west of Mosul - and killed many Turkmen in organised attacks.

Tal Afar is a Turkmen-majority city in Iraq's northern Nineveh province, of which Mosul is the provincial capital.

On March 9, 2016, the terrorist group attacked Taza Khurmatu - located around 20km south of Kirkuk - with mortar cannons that reportedly included chemical weapons.

Three Turkmen were killed and hundreds of others injured in that attack.

Revenge attacks in Mosul

There are growing fears of revenge attacks by Iraqi forces against Mosul residents accused of participating in Daesh's operations, rights groups and residents said.

Human Rights Watch (HRW) says the civilians are being subjected to detention camps by Iraqi forces rather than being protected.

On Thursday HRW said that international observers have discovered an execution site in west Mosul where 17 men were shot after being blindfolded.

There is no evidence that Iraqi troops were directly involved. But residents say soldiers were there the night before, and intense gunfire was heard before they left.

The families also say harassment by Iraqi soldiers may have forced their relatives to join Daesh.

"The Iraqi army used to come into our house and crash our house, searching for guns. I had all my girls with me and they were getting harassed. And as a reaction, I think that is why my husband joined them (Daesh)," a Mosul resident told TRT World.

TRT World spoke to journalist Ash Gallagher from Erbil for more details.

Mass displacements

About 900,000 people have fled the fighting in Mosul, with more than a third in camps outside the city and the rest living with family and friends in other neighbourhoods.

Many fleeing civilians have been accused of being part of Daesh operations.

Daesh had taken control of the Iraqi city in 2014 and the Iraqi forces spent months fighting a gruelling battle before announcing victory on July 10, ending Daesh's rule in the stronghold of the group's self-proclaimed caliphate.

Trump says Daesh crumbling

US President Donald Trump on Thursday declared that Daesh is crumbling, as he met with Pentagon officials to discuss US military campaigns and progress in eradicating "radical Islamic terrorism."

"We're doing very well against ISIS (Daesh). ISIS (Daesh) is falling fast, very fast," Trump said.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies