Led by Saudi Arabia, several states in the Middle East and Africa have severed ties with Qatar since June 5, accusing the gas-rich Gulf state of supporting terrorism and Iran. Qatar denies the allegations.

A woman writes on a wall depicting Qatar's emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al Thani, which has attracted signatures and comments of support from residents, amid a diplomatic crisis between Qatar and neighbouring Arab countries, in Doha, Monday, July 3, 2017.
A woman writes on a wall depicting Qatar's emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al Thani, which has attracted signatures and comments of support from residents, amid a diplomatic crisis between Qatar and neighbouring Arab countries, in Doha, Monday, July 3, 2017.

Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and several other Sunni-majority countries have severed relations with Qatar since June 5, accusing the Gulf state of supporting terrorism based on its ties with the Muslim Brotherhood, Hamas and the Taliban.

Another point of departure is Qatar's ties with Iran, with whom it shares one of the world's biggest gas fields.

Qatar has denied the accusations and called the collective decision "unjustified." Kuwait, Turkey and the US have all urged a political solution as the bloc isolates Qatar using various ad hoc sanctions, including shutting down their airspace to Qataris and blocking import routes.

The dispute began in May when Qatar's Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al Thani was reported to have made statements on the state news agency supporting Iran. Doha said the statements were fabricated and disseminated via a hack.

Here are the latest developments in the crisis:

July 26, Wednesday

Qatar says new terror list is "disappointing surprise"

Qatar has said a decision by four Arab states to add 18 groups and individuals allegedly linked to Doha to their "terrorist" lists was "a disappointing surprise" and that it was doing all it could to fight extremism.

"This (list) comes as a disappointing surprise that the blockading countries are still pursuing this story as part of their smear campaign against Qatar," Sheikh Saif Bin Ahmed al-Thani, director of the Gulf kingdom's Government Communications Office, said in a statement.

"This latest list provides further evidence that the blockading countries are not committed to the fight against terrorism. As we have previously stated, all individuals with links to terrorism in Qatar have been prosecuted."

Sheikh Saif said Qatar constantly reviews its anti-terror laws to "remain on the front foot in the fight against extremism and terror financing".

The lists now include three Yemeni charities, three Libyan media outlets, two armed groups and a religious foundation, some of which are already subject to US sanctions.

"The terrorist activities of the aforementioned entities and individuals have direct and indirect ties with the Qatari authorities," a statement issued by Saudi Arabia, Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain said.

For more on earlier developments click here.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies