The battle for Mosul explained in pictures

The Iraqi army along with international support has regained many towns from Daesh since October 17. It is yet unknown how long the battle for Mosul will last.

Photo by: Reuters
Photo by: Reuters

The battle to recapture the Daesh-controlled territory started in the early hours of October 17, when the Iraqi government, US military, local militias and Kurdish fighters launched operations to the south and east of Mosul. Mosul, Iraq, October 17.

Updated Oct 26, 2016

The battle for Mosul has been continuing for over a week. The northern Iraqi city is the second largest city in the country and where Daesh proclaimed the establishment of its state in 2014. 

The Iraqi government, US military, local militias and Kurdish fighters have launched an operation to take back the city and oust the terror organisation.

At stake is a fight to end the group's two-year stranglehold over a large portion of Iraqi territory.


The Kurdistan region's President Massoud Barzani called the Mosul operation a "turning point in the war against terrorism," during a press conference just kilometres away from the frontline of the fights. Khazir frontline, Iraq. October 17.


Daesh is blowing up homes, mosques, churches and businesses, leaving nothing for civilians when they return. Civilians who tried to escape claim to have been robbed of valuables, goods or livestock at Daesh checkpoints. South of Mosul, Iraq. October 18.


Daesh has dug deep tunnels, some booby-trapped with improvised explosive devices and others leading the way to escape routes. Batralla, Iraq. October 19.


In order to limit the displacement of civilians during the operation aimed at taking back Mosul from Daesh terrorists, the UN, Baghdad and Iraq's Kurdish Regional Government signed a three-way protocol days before the clashes. Batralla, Iraq, October 19.


Only 7,500 tent shelters are available, and most are already occupied, the manager of Degaba camp, Ahmad Abdu, said. As many as one million people are expected to be displaced due to the clashes. Erbil, Iraq. October 20. 


Battles continue but the Iraqi army takes a minute to rest. A member of the Iraqi army takes time to pray after the village of Khalidya was liberated from Daesh. Khalidya, Iraq. October 20. 


Representatives from 23 countries and three regional and international organisations met to hold talks on the importance of providing humanitarian aid to the city of Mosul, as well as protecting civilians. Paris, France. October 20.


Families who fled their homes due to clashes in Mosul arrive at a camp, north of the city. Men are being searched and question to assure the safety of the displaced making sure there are no ties to Daesh. Bashiqa, Iraq. October 21.


Iraqi government forces and the international coalition forces liberated eight villages south and southeast of Mosul. Kurdish forces also attacked from the north and east, taking back several other villages, said statements from military commands. Bartella, Iraq. October 21


The Turkish Red Crescent said it was sending aid trucks to northern Iraq with food and humanitarian supplies for up to 10,000 people who have been displaced by clashes around Mosul. Deepaka camp in the northwest of Erbil, Iraq. October 22.


Daesh has taken 550 families from villages around Mosul and is holding them close to its strongholds in the city, probably as human shields, a spokeswoman for the UN human rights office said in Geneva. Deepaka camp in the northwest of Erbil, Iraq. October 23


The Iraqi army's media office said about 50 villages had been taken from Daesh terrorists since the start of the operations. Iraq estimates 5,000 to 6,000 terrorists are in Mosul. Deepaka camp in the northwest of Erbil, Iraq. October 23.


Peshmerga forces captured a key road linking the northern Iraqi town of Bashiqa to the Daesh-held town of Mosul after they freed Bashiqa from the terrorists. The offensive to take Mosul is expected to become the biggest battle in the country since the US-led invasion in 2003. Qayyara, Iraq. October 23.

Source: 
TRTWorld and agencies