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In pictures: Florence wreaks havoc in Carolinas

  • 18 Sep 2018

Officials say the death toll from Hurricane Florence, now a tropical depression, has jumped to at least 32.

Bob Richling carries Iris Darden, 84, into her flooded home joined by Darden's son, David Darden Jr., to gather her belongings in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in Spring Lake, North Carolina. ( AP )

The death toll from Hurricane Florence rose to at least 32 in three states, with 25 fatalities in North Carolina, as remnants of the once-powerful Category 4 hurricane now reduced to a rainy, windy mass of low pressure speeded up towards the Northeast.

With one of North Carolina's largest cities still mostly cut off by floodwaters from Hurricane Florence, officials prepared to begin distributing food, water and tarps to Wilmington residents as yet more people were rescued from submerged inland neighbourhoods.

Workers will hand out supplies to stranded residents in the city of 120,000 people beginning on Tuesday morning, county officials say.

At the White House, President Donald Trump said almost 20,000 military personnel and federal workers were deployed to help with the aftermath.

US Coast Guard rescue swimmer Samuel Knoeppel (C) and Randy Haba (R) help Willie Schubert on a stranded van in Pollocksville, North Carolina, USA, Monday, September 17, 2018.(AP)
Willie Schubert of Pollocksville, North Carolina (R) shakes the hand of US Coast Guard rescue swimmer Samuel Knoeppel (L) as flight mechanic, David Franklin (2nd L), and swimmer Randy Haba (2nd R), stow their gear after Schubert was rescued off a stranded van in Pollocksville, Monday, September 17, 2018.(Reuters)
A couple walks with their daughter after checking on their flooded home in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in Spring Lake, North Carolina, Monday, September 17, 2018.(AP)
People use a road as a boat ramp after Hurricane Florence struck the Carolinas Monday, September 17, 2018, in Conway, South Carolina. Many rivers in the Carolinas are approaching record flood stages and their levels will continue to rise through the week.(AP)
In this long-exposure photograph, the Cape Fear River flows under train tracks at a near record height as it continues to rise in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in Fayetteville, North Carolina, Monday, September 17, 2018.(AP)
An American flag flies in the wind as the Cape Fear River rises to near record heights in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in Fayetteville, North Carolina, Monday, September 17, 2018.(AP)
A group of local fishermen keep an eye on the Cape Fear River as they stage for potential water rescues while additional flooding remains a threat from Florence, in Fayetteville, North Carolina, Sunday, September 16, 2018.(AP)

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