Despite an investment on clean technology, China continues to battle poor air and water quality as one of the world's most polluted nations.

A Chinese police officer wearing a mask against pollution stands near Tiananmen Gate with a giant portrait of Mao Zedong outside the Great Hall of the People on the eve of the annual legislature's opening session in Beijing, March 4, 2018.
A Chinese police officer wearing a mask against pollution stands near Tiananmen Gate with a giant portrait of Mao Zedong outside the Great Hall of the People on the eve of the annual legislature's opening session in Beijing, March 4, 2018. (AP)

China seeks investment on clean technology amid major environmental pollution problems as air pollution rose by more than a quarter in parts of northern China in March, and the region has been hit by another bout of smog in the second half of April, which the Ministry of Ecology and Environment (MEE) has blamed on weak air circulation.

The country met its 2013-2017 air quality targets after forcing major polluters like steel mills and coal-fired power generators to raise standards and upgrade their technology, and it also shut down thousands of smaller law-breaking enterprises.

The government in Beijing is funding clean technologies like electric vehicles and solar panels.

Yutong says it sold about 25,000 green buses last year

"The emissions will be decreased by at least 30%, energy consumption is also decreased by 30% compare to that of burning oil," said Chen Mingjing, an Administration Official of Yutong.

But despite its investment, China continues to battle poor air and water quality as one of the world's most polluted nations.

TRT World's William Denselow reports from Zhengzhou.

Source: TRT World