France's emergency measures were imposed two years ago, after 130 people were killed during coordinated terror attacks in Paris.

Soldiers of the 17/5 mobile police unit of Moulins carry FAMAS assault rifles during a visit by French Interior Minister Gerard Collomb (not pictured) at the Saint Lazare train station shopping centre on October 31, 2017 in Paris.
Soldiers of the 17/5 mobile police unit of Moulins carry FAMAS assault rifles during a visit by French Interior Minister Gerard Collomb (not pictured) at the Saint Lazare train station shopping centre on October 31, 2017 in Paris. (AFP)

Anti-terrorism measures in France are being replaced on Wednesday by a new permanent legislation, as a two-year state of emergency comes to an end.

President Emmanuel Macron defended new security legislation on Tuesday, saying terrorists still posed a serious threat to France. 

The controversial law gives police sweeping new powers to make arrests, close down mosques, and restrict the movement of suspects all without judicial oversight. 

France's emergency measures were imposed after 130 people were killed in coordinated attacks across Paris in November 2015.

More than 240 people have been killed on French soil in terrorist attacks in almost three years.

This year alone there have been 11 terror attacks and 14 prevented and new fears of French militants returning from Syria and Iraq.

Some believe a tougher law is the right call, while others fear the new legislation will damage France's civil rights. 

TRTWorld’s Simon McGregor-Wood reports.

Source: Reuters