The World Health Organization reports the number of people who contracted measles in Europe in 2017 was four times higher than the year before.

A doctor's assistant prepares a measles vaccination in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015.
A doctor's assistant prepares a measles vaccination in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015. ( AP )

Vaccines for children have for a long time caused concern for some parents. Despite a number of studies that suggest they're safe, people still have doubts. 

The World Health Organization reports the number of people who contracted measles in Europe in 2017 was four times higher than the year before.

In EU member states like Romania and Italy, there were more than 5,000 cases detected in each country last year. In Germany and Greece, nearly 1,000 each.

And in the WHO's European region, the illness caused 35 deaths. 

But some doctors like Kris Gaublomme say vaccinanations can cause autism and attention-deficit disorders, despite several major studies to the contrary.

He's advising parents to question whether their children should receive them.

TRT World's Jack Parrock reports on the situation in Europe and what may be the potential consequences of large numbers of parents refusing to have their children vaccinated.

Source: TRT World