The world's youngest nation, which gained independence in 2011, has been rocked by a four-year civil war and a crumbling economy. For some people, cemeteries have become home, but not by choice.

Mary Abong (L) and Alissa Lual, two displaced mothers, collect water from a road construction site near their Internally Displaced Person (IDP) camp formed by local community members at Barmayen village in Aweil state some 740 km northwest of Juba, the capital of South Sudan, on November 22, 2017.
Mary Abong (L) and Alissa Lual, two displaced mothers, collect water from a road construction site near their Internally Displaced Person (IDP) camp formed by local community members at Barmayen village in Aweil state some 740 km northwest of Juba, the capital of South Sudan, on November 22, 2017. (AFP)

South Sudan's four-year civil war has displaced more than four million people – that's almost half the country's population.

South Sudan's economy has also been ruined by the war. Its main income is from its oil reserves but fighting has slashed production to less than a third of pre-war levels.

Public money is tight and civil servants and soldiers go unpaid for months, and hyperinflation has rendered its currency almost worthless.

Hundreds of thousands have fled their villages and sought shelter in the capital.

Juba has been relatively peaceful but the population surge is putting pressure on its meagre resources, such as land.

As TRT World's Nick Davies-Jones reports, some residents have been forced to live in cemeteries.

Source: TRT World