Students are returning to schools in the province's "de-escalation zone" where Turkish troops have implemented a ceasefire deal agreed with Russia and Iran.

Emergency procedures may be in place, but for now the only alarms going off in Idlib are these school bells.
Emergency procedures may be in place, but for now the only alarms going off in Idlib are these school bells. (Reuters file)

Schools have reopened in some parts of Syria's Idlib after Turkish troops entered the province earlier this month to monitor a ceasefire deal.

Turkish soldiers have set up observation posts across the province to monitor a de-escalation zone in a deal signed with Russia and Iran, which has given a new lease of life to Idlib's besieged population.

"We used to be afraid and ran away when planes carry out an air strike, but now we are relieved there is no bombing anymore," said 12-year-old student Omar Baradi.

The city isn't being bombed any more, and that has brought about a sense of relief.

"Under the bombing, education was really bad. When students used to hear the bombing they'd run out of school and we shut the school down for a week or a month until people feel safe again,” said Shahoud al Khatib, a teacher.

"Now after the de-escalation zone agreement the situation is much better. Students are back to school and they're attending classes."

TRT World's Rahul Radhakrishnan has their story.

Fear that air strikes could resume

Russian and regime war planes had targeted southern Idlib with a series of air strikes in September, in response to attacks launched by Hayat Tahrir al Sham militant group.

This has worried civilians in the safer areas who fear the bombing may resume in their areas too.

"To be honest we have our fears that the bombing may resume, the regime doesn't keep its word," said Mohamad al Hussein, Idlib's Director of Education.

As of now emergency procedures may be in place, but the only alarms going off in Idlib are the school bells.

Source: TRT World