A week-long closure ordered by the Saudi-led coalition has been relaxed with the reopening of some airports and border crossings in Yemen but many stuck inside miss on aid and essential medicines.

Aid agencies warned of famine and a health catastrophe if other entry points and ports stay shut.
Aid agencies warned of famine and a health catastrophe if other entry points and ports stay shut. ( AFP file )

A week-long closure ordered by the Saudi-led coalition has been relaxed with the reopening of some airports and border crossings in Yemen.

The coalition has reopened entry points but only in areas controlled by forces allied to the government.

The blockade that came after Yemen's Houthi rebel forces fired a missile at Riyadh on November 4, left desperately needed aid stuck outside Yemen, and Yemenis needing treatment stuck inside.

One such victim is Fareed, who was hit by a shrapnel, a year ago. 

"He was going to travel, we had prepared the papers and talked about it, but now, after the closing of the borders we don't know where to go. It's not possible for us to leave from any place, in order to arrive in Egypt," said Fareed's sister Samia al Breihi.

World's worst humanitarian crisis

The UN has called Yemen the world's worst humanitarian crisis and the war between government-allied forces, backed by a Saudi-led coalition, and Iranian-allied Houthi rebels, continues unrestrained.

According to official data, the conflict has killed more than 10,000 people and across the country families like Fareed's are struggling to get by.

"It's a violation against the rights of the people of Yemen. We are calling on the leadership of the Arab coalition to open these border crossings, especially for civilians, for foodstuffs, for medical supplies to pass through," said Noureldeeen al Mansouri, a rights activist.

Humanitarian groups have warned that tightening the blockade on Yemen could take millions closer to starvation.

TRT World's Abubakr Al-Shamahi has more.

Source: TRT World