"We strongly condemn this outdated approach," says Fahrettin Altun, Turkey's Communications Director, after a Greek website leaks personal information of a Turkish reporter in Athens.

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No "fascist element" can deter our reporters working in Greece, says Turkish Communications Director Fahrettin Altun. (AA)

Turkey has condemned a Greek website that shared personal information of a Turkish reporter working in Greece, apparently in an attempt to intimidate him, as row continues between Ankara and Athens over the eastern Mediterranean. 

"We strongly condemn this outdated approach. Our reporters will carry out their duties under the guarantee of the state of the Republic of Turkey," Fahrettin Altun, Turkey’s Communications Director, said on Tuesday. 

"No fascist element can prevent it." 

Turkikanea.gr, a Greek-based, anti-Turkish website, posted information about Necat Ahmet, a reporter for TRT Haber, Turkey’s public news broadcaster.

It's not clear how the anti-Turkey website was able to collect the information of the Turkish reporters, such as passport pictures, that should be in the Greek government's database only.

Previously in a tweet, Altun had accused the Greek government of leaking Turkish reporters' personal information risking their lives.

"My message to Greece is as follows: You will pay the price if those Turkish reporters come in harm’s way," Altun had said.

READ MORE: Greek website threatens Turkish journalists, accuses them of spying

Website targets AA journalists

Last Wednesday, the website also published a provocative editorial targeting Anadolu Agency's Athens correspondent Tevfik Durul and photojournalist Ayhan Mehmet, who travelled to Greece's Meis Island, also known as Kastellorizo, to cover recent developments there.

The website also published a photo from Durul’s passport and information on Mehmet's birthplace.

Senol Kazanci, Anadolu Agency’s director-general, Altun, and the Global Journalism Council condemned the website's actions.

READ MORE: What would the eastern Mediterranean look like if Turkey was in the EU?

Greece appears to militarise the island of Meis, also known as Kastellorizo, which should be demilitarised according to the Paris Peace Treaty of 1947, is just 2 km away from the Turkish mainland.
Greece appears to militarise the island of Meis, also known as Kastellorizo, which should be demilitarised according to the Paris Peace Treaty of 1947, is just 2 km away from the Turkish mainland. (Zeyd Abdullah Alshagouri / TRTWorld)

Militarisation of island

According to media reports, Greek authorities recently deployed military elements to the island of Meis.

Ankara said the move is breaching the 1947 Paris peace treaties and counterproductive to the peace, as the island has had a demilitarised status.

The 10-square-kilometre island has been cited by Greece as justifying thousands of miles of maritime jurisdiction, even though it is only 2 km from Turkey but nearly 600 km from Greece, and ignoring Turkey having a longer Mediterranean coastline than any other country.

READ MORE: Kastellorizo: the next crisis spot between Turkey and Greece?

Source: TRTWorld and agencies