The rapper and actor died after suffering catastrophic cardiac arrest at a New York hospital, his family said.

DMX performs during the BET Hip Hop Awards in Atlanta on Oct 1, 2011.
DMX performs during the BET Hip Hop Awards in Atlanta on Oct 1, 2011. (AP)

DMX, hip-hop artist who produced the songs “Ruff Ryders’ Anthem” and “Party Up (Up in Here)" and who rapped with a trademark delivery that was often paired with growls, barks and “What!” as an ad-lib, has died, according to a statement from his family. He was 50.

The Grammy-nominated performer died after suffering “catastrophic cardiac arrest,” according to the hospital in White Plains, New York, where he died. 

He was rushed there from his home April 2.

The rapper, whose real name is Earl Simmons, had struggled with drug addiction since his teenage years. 

His lawyer, Murray Richman, had earlier said he could not confirm reports that DMX overdosed.

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Last minutes

"We are deeply saddened to announce today that our loved one, DMX, birth name of Earl Simmons, passed away at 50 years old at White Plains Hospital with his family by his side after being placed on life support for the past few days," his family wrote in a statement quoted by People magazine.

DMX collapsed at home, his family had said, and was taken to a New York hospital where his former manager said he had been placed on life support with no brain activity.

Celebrity publications TMZ and Billboard said he overdosed on drugs triggering a heart attack.

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Battling addiction

Growing up in Yonkers, New York, DMX took his moniker from the name of a drum machine used in rap songs. 

When he was 14, an older rapper who had been a mentor tricked him into smoking crack, DMX said in a documentary series broadcast on BET.

"He created a monster," he said. "Cocaine almost took my life on a few occasions."

His debut album in 1998, "It's Dark and Hell is Hot," was the first of five in a row to top the Billboard 200 chart in the United States. 

He was the only rap artist with such a streak, according to a 2019 profile in GQ magazine

He studied the Bible and prayed before and after every show, he told GQ.

"Performing in front of people is beyond a high. It's beyond a high that any drug could duplicate," he said.

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'Hip-hop Johnny Cash'

The rapper's intense songs told stories of a complex character's "sins of the streets," according to a biography on allmusic.com, which described DMX as a "hip-hop Johnny Cash."

His album “…And Then There Was X” was his biggest seller, certified five-time multiplatinum. DMX released eight albums and was nominated for three Grammys.

DMX earned more than 40 film and TV credits, including "Belly," "Romeo Must Die," and action films "Cradle 2 the Grave" and "Exit Wounds," also contributing music to their soundtracks.

He had 15 children, according to media reports.

Before he died, his ex-wife Tashera Simmons, with whom he had four children, attended a vigil outside his hospital, where hundreds of fans danced to DMX songs. "The love is real," she posted on Instagram.

Basketball star LeBron James had tweeted while DMX was in hospital: "To one of my fav artist growing up and still to this day DMX, my prayers are with you and sent to the almighty heaven’s above!"

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Prison time

In 2017, DMX pleaded guilty in federal court to avoiding paying $1.7 million in taxes from 2000 to 2005 by shifting money among accounts belonging to managers and associates.

He was sentenced to one year in prison.

The rap star’s prior arrest record included charges of animal cruelty, reckless driving, drug possession, weapons charges and probation violations. He served prison time in Arizona and New York.

In the 1998 song "Slippin'," DMX rapped: "To live is to suffer, But to survive, well, that's to find meaning in the suffering." 

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Source: TRTWorld and agencies