Strong 6.3 magnitude earthquake hits central Greece, prompting residents in the city of Larissa to rush into the streets, with shocks felt as far away as neighbouring Albania, North Macedonia, Kosovo and Montenegro.

A Greek national flag flutters as people visit a beach, following the coronavirus disease outbreak, in Athens, Greece, April 28, 2020.
A Greek national flag flutters as people visit a beach, following the coronavirus disease outbreak, in Athens, Greece, April 28, 2020. (Reuters)

An earthquake with a 6.3 magnitude struck central Greece and was felt as far away as the capitals of neighbouring Albania, North Macedonia, Kosovo and Montenegro.

A fire service official in Athens said on Wednesday there were no reports of damages or injuries so far but added: "My colleagues felt it, it was strong."

The quake sent people rushing out of homes and office buildings into the streets in the town of Larissa. 

It's epicentre was 22 kilometres west-northwest of the town and it struck just after 1015 GMT, according to the European-Mediterranean Seismological Center, which put the preliminary magnitude at 6.3.

The United States Geological Survey and the Global Seismic Monitor Geofon also put the quake's magnitude at 6.3.

READ MORE: Search and rescue continue after strong quake rattles Turkey, Greece

Numerous aftershocks rattled the area, including one with a preliminary magnitude of 4.9.

Greece lies in a highly seismically active region. The vast majority of earthquakes cause no damage or injuries.

Last October, an earthquake that struck the eastern Greek Aegean island of Samos and the nearby Turkish coast killed two people on Samos and at least 75 people in Turkey.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies