Children in Cameroon's English-speaking regions should be heading to school. But they've had to stay home over a boycott against the government's treatment of English speakers.

Anti-government demonstrators block a road in Bamenda, Cameroon, which has been a protest hub over marginalisation complaints in the largely Francophone country.
Anti-government demonstrators block a road in Bamenda, Cameroon, which has been a protest hub over marginalisation complaints in the largely Francophone country. (Reuters)

It's back to school time in Cameroon. But in English-speaking regions, children are staying home due to a general strike by English-speaking activists.

English speakers, who make up less than a fifth of the country's 23 million people, say they are marginalised and discriminated against by the French-speaking majority.

Activists have called for English speakers to boycott schools, saying it's the only way they can get the government's attention.

But not everyone agrees that a boycott that keeps children out of school is the best way to address the problem.

TRT World's Sara Firth Reports.

Source: TRT World