The indigenous culture is a silent culture – islanders have been silenced about ecocide and other injustices on their land for centuries. But Giovanny Barrantes hopes music can be a new way to share the feelings of his people.

Women sing and dance during anniversary celebrations of the Guna Revolution in Ustupu, an island in the Guna Yala region on Panama's Caribbean coast. Tribe members commemorate the February 25, 1925 clash with police with parades and dances.
Women sing and dance during anniversary celebrations of the Guna Revolution in Ustupu, an island in the Guna Yala region on Panama's Caribbean coast. Tribe members commemorate the February 25, 1925 clash with police with parades and dances. ( AP )

Panama's indigenous Guna people are threatened by climate change. As the Caribbean Sea level continues to rise, the residents are considering abandoning the islands they have lived on for generations. 

Giovanny Barrantes, a member of the tribe, found a way to express his people’s feelings – through music.

He hopes through his music he can make an impact on the silent indigenous community Guna which has been damaged "by western cultures for many centuries by disrespecting trees and animals."

TRT World's Anelise Borges has more. 

Source: TRT World