Deputy Prime Minister Recep Akdag revised the death toll and said the search and rescue operation was over. The train that derailed on Sunday was carrying 362 passengers and six crew. An investigation into the incident is underway.

The scene on July 9 after several bogies of a passenger train derailed at Sarilar village in Corlu district, Tekirdag province, Turkey, July 8, 2018.
The scene on July 9 after several bogies of a passenger train derailed at Sarilar village in Corlu district, Tekirdag province, Turkey, July 8, 2018. (AA)

At least 24 people were killed when a passenger train derailed in Turkey’s northwestern province of Tekirdag, Turkish Deputy Prime Minister Recep Akdag said on Monday.

The train, carrying 362 passengers and six train staff, was travelling from Edirne province to Istanbul when five bogies derailed near Sarilar village of Corlu district on Sunday.

"24 of our citizens have lost their lives," said Akdag, revising the death toll in a press briefing.

Around 100 ambulances were sent to the scene, and military helicopters were despatched to airlift injured passengers.

Akdag said that search and rescue operations at the accident site were completed as of 0300 GMT (6am local time) on Monday.

TRT World's Jeffrey Bishku-Aykul reports.

Investigation ordered

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan conveyed his condolences to the families of those who lost their lives in the accident and wished a speedy recovery to the injured passengers. 

He said the cause of the accident was under investigation.

Turkish prosecutor's office has called two technicians to take their statements over the train derailment.

Rain blamed for accident

Local authorities are pointing to rain as the likely culprit.

Mehmet Ceylan, the governor of Tekirdag province, said heavy rains in the area had preceded the accident.

Minister of Transport, Maritime Affairs, and Communications Ahmet Arslan said the accident occurred after rain damaged the tracks.

Arslan said an annual check of the tracks had been done in April.

Source: AA