The Sudanese military has detained hundreds of government officials, protesters, and activists that support the restoration of civilian rule in the country.

Pro-democracy groups in Sudan have been demanding the restoration of the transitional government and the release of detained political figures.
Pro-democracy groups in Sudan have been demanding the restoration of the transitional government and the release of detained political figures. (Marwan Ali / AP)

Two leading international rights groups have urged Sudan’s military to release government officials, activists and others detained during the army's coup last month.

In a joint statement released on Tuesday, Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International also urged Sudan rulers to end “further arbitrary arrests” and the crackdown on anti-coup protests.

“The Sudanese people have the rights to peaceful protest, to liberty and security, fair trial, and many more that the military cannot undermine,” the statement quoted Sarah Jackson, Amnesty's deputy regional director as saying.

Jackson also urged the international community to adopt a “joint, coordinated, and strong regional and international response” to rights violations in Sudan.

Mohamed Osman, Human Rights Watch's researcher on Sudan, said that since the coup, the Sudanese “military has resorted to its well-trodden and brutal tactics, undermining small but important progress on rights and freedoms that Sudanese from all walks of life have fought for.”

READ MORE: Sudan security forces fire teargas, arrest dozens of anti-coup protesters

'Undermining rights and freedoms'

On October 25, the Sudanese military seized power, dissolving the country’s transitional government and detaining over 100 government officials and political leaders, along with a large number of protesters and activists.

Since the takeover, at least 14 anti-coup protesters have been killed due to excessive force used by the country’s security forces, according to Sudanese doctors and the United Nations.

Moez Hadra, a defence lawyer for the deposed officials, said he and other defence lawyers have yet to be allowed to communicate with some of their clients or even know their whereabouts.

According to Hadra, twenty-five of those detained face charges of inciting troops to rebel against their leaders. If convicted, they would likely face up to life imprisonment.

The Sudanese people have taken to the streets in masses against the coup, insisting on a full civilian government to rule Sudan during the transition.

International mediation efforts have been underway to find a way out of the crisis, or at least return Sudan to its pre-coup status, with little headway.

READ MORE: Q&A: Why is there a standoff in the Sudan coup?

Source: AP