Search and rescue teams, with dogs in tow, were deployed across the blackened ruins of southern Oregon towns as smoldering wildfires ravaged US Pacific Coast states after causing widespread destruction.

A search and rescue team, surrounded by red fire retardant, look for victims under burned residences and vehicles in the aftermath of the Almeda fire in Talent, Oregon, US, September 13, 2020.
A search and rescue team, surrounded by red fire retardant, look for victims under burned residences and vehicles in the aftermath of the Almeda fire in Talent, Oregon, US, September 13, 2020. (Reuters)

Nearly all the dozens of people reported missing after a devastating blaze in southern Oregon have been accounted for over the weekend as crews battled wildfires that have killed at least 35 from California to Washington state.

The flames up and down the West Coast have destroyed neighbourhoods, leaving nothing but charred rubble and burned-out cars, forced tens of thousands to flee and cast a shroud of smoke that has given Seattle, San Francisco and Portland, Oregon, some of the worst air quality in the world.

The smoke filled the air with an acrid metallic smell like pennies and spread to nearby states.

While making it difficult to breathe, it helped firefighters by blocking the sun and turning the weather cooler as they tried to get a handle on the blazes.

But warnings of low moisture and strong winds that could fan the flames added urgency to the battle. The so-called red flag warnings stretched from hard-hit southern Oregon to Northern California and extended through Monday evening.

Search and rescue teams, with dogs in tow, were deployed across the blackened ruins of southern Oregon towns on Sunday.

There were 34 active fires burning in Oregon as of Sunday morning, according to the state's office of emergency management website.

READ MORE: Smoke chokes West Coast as wildfire deaths keep climbing

'Big, huge flow of dark smoke'

Lexi Soulios, her husband and son were afraid they would have to evacuate for a second time because of the weather. They left their small southern Oregon town of Talent last week when they saw a “big, huge flow of dark smoke coming up," then went past roadblocks to pick through the charred ruins of their home on Friday.

While they are staying farther south in Ashland, known for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, she said by text message that the forecast may mean they could be on the move again.

“So this isn't over yet but we just had the car checked so we feel prepared," Lexi Soulios wrote.

Number of fatalities is likely to rise

Authorities last week reported as many as 50 people could be missing after a wildfire in the Ashland area. But the Jackson County Sheriff’s office said late on Saturday that four people had died in the blaze and that the number of missing was down to one.

At least 10 people have been killed in the past week throughout Oregon. Officials have said more people are missing from other fires, and the number of fatalities is likely to rise, though they have not said how high the toll could go as they search. In California, 24 people have died, and one in Washington state. Thousands of homes and other buildings have burned.

Barbara Rose Bettison, 25, left her farm among the trees and fields of Eagle Creek, outside Portland, when a sheriff’s deputy knocked on her door on Tuesday.

They drove away on a road that became an ominous dividing line, with blue skies on one side and the other filled with black and brown smoke.

She took shelter at an Elks Lodge near Portland, where evacuees wrapped themselves in blankets and set up tents out back.

“It’s terrifying. We’ve never had any form of natural disaster,” she said.

Bettison, a UPS driver, was able to get out with her chickens, rabbits and cats. She hasn’t been back, but neighbours said it is so smoky they can’t see their hands in front of their faces.

“I’m hoping there has not been too much damage because it would break my heart,” she said.

“As long as we're still standing, I think we’ll be OK.”

READ MORE: Dozens missing as firefighters battle two large Oregon fires

'These are climate fires'

The Democratic governors of all three states have said the fires are a consequence of climate change, taking aim at President Donald Trump ahead of his visit Monday to California for a fire briefing.

“And it is maddening right now that, when we have this cosmic challenge to our communities, with the entire West Coast of the United States on fire, to have a president to deny that these are not just wildfires, these are climate fires," Washington Governor Jay Inslee said on ABC's “This Week" on Sunday.

At a rally in Nevada, Trump blamed inadequate forest management, which White House adviser Peter Navarro echoed on CNN’s “State of the Union,” saying that for many years in California, “particularly because of budget cutbacks, there was no inclination to manage our forests.”

A firefighter works to extinguish the Bobcat Fire after an evacuation was ordered for the residents of Arcadia, California, US, September 13, 2020.
A firefighter works to extinguish the Bobcat Fire after an evacuation was ordered for the residents of Arcadia, California, US, September 13, 2020. (Reuters)

Firefighter Steve McAdoo found himself running from one blaze to another in Oregon for six days, seeing buildings burn and trees light up like candles.

“We lost track of time because you can’t see the sun and you’ve been up for so many days,” he said.

“Forty-eight to 72 hours nonstop, you feel like you’re in a dream.”

As he and his team battled the blazes, he worried about his wife and daughter at home just miles away. They evacuated safely, but at times he could communicate with them only in one-word text messages: “busy.”

McAdoo and other firefighters got their first real break on Sunday to take showers, shave and check their equipment. And though it’s a faint shadow of its usual self, he can finally see the sun.

“It’s nice today to at least see the dot in the sky,” he said.

READ MORE: Death toll from California wildfires rises, half a million evacuate

Source: TRTWorld and agencies