Pressure on children to succeed in Hong Kong's vaunted but highly competitive education system sometimes comes at the expense of sleep and play. A charity formed by a group of parents and concerned people is trying to change that.

Primary school students visiting a national education centre in Hong Kong. June 27, 2012.
Primary school students visiting a national education centre in Hong Kong. June 27, 2012. (Reuters Archive)

Hong Kong's education system is the envy of many countries. 

Students in this autonomous Chinese territory regularly top academic league tables, and graduates from the city are some of the most employable in the world. 

But critics say the intense examination system, pressure from school and lengthy homework, mean children are often working too hard at the expense of sleep and play.

"I feel very worried about it. So I first take a shower for fifteen minutes and then get to this table and do my homework quickly," said nine-year-old Rachel. 

Now, EDiversity – a charity formed by a group of concerned parents and supporters – is trying to change the fate of the students. 

"Physically, mentally, emotionally they are disturbed, and it's not only affecting the kids as well, it's also affecting family relationships," said Doreen Ho, a member of EDiversity.

TRT World's Joel Flynn has more from Hong Kong.

Source: TRT World