Victims of sexual abuse in Hong Kong are speaking out, but say they're not getting the same support as women in other parts of the world.

#MeToo is seen in this January 25, 2018 file photo during a news conference on a Title IX lawsuit outside the Department of Education in Washington, DC.
#MeToo is seen in this January 25, 2018 file photo during a news conference on a Title IX lawsuit outside the Department of Education in Washington, DC. ( AFP )

The #MeToo movement encouraging sexually assaulted women to speak out against perpetrators has swept the western countries.

It has exposed men accused of rape and harassment in fields including entertainment, politics and business.

Dozens of prominent men have quit or been fired from high-profile posts, and police have opened investigations into some accusations of sex assault.

The campaign has recently reached to Hong Kong, but contrary to its huge positive effect in the west has faced a strong backlash.

Many women who have told their stories, sharing the hope of turning themselves from "victim" to "survivor", have been blamed for being attention seekers.

As TRT World's Diane To reports even their own families didn't believe the victims.

Source: TRT World