Several political parties have alleged vote-rigging, and have threatened nationwide protests, unless a new election is called.

Election officials count ballots after polls closed during the general election in Islamabad, Pakistan, July 25, 2018.
Election officials count ballots after polls closed during the general election in Islamabad, Pakistan, July 25, 2018. (AFP)

A group of political parties in Pakistan have rejected the results of Wednesday's general election and are calling for a fresh poll.

While final results are still to be announced, former cricketer, Imran Khan declared victory. 

His Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf party (PTI) is ahead in the polls, but the party still falls short of a simple majority needed to form government on it's own. 

Several political parties have alleged vote-rigging, and have threatened nationwide protests, unless a new election is called.

The party of jailed ex-prime minister Nawaz Sharif initially rejected the so far incomplete results, but by Friday its leaders appeared to accept that Khan would be the next prime minister

'Will sit on opposition benches'

"We are going to sit on opposition benches, despite all the reservations," said Shairif's nephew Hamza Shehbaz.

The allegations of rigging in Wednesday's election followed a bitter campaign in which Pakistan's powerful military was accused of tilting the race in favour of Khan, and trying to erase democratic gains made since the most recent spell of military rule ended in 2008.

Although Khan appeared likely to fall short of the 137 seats needed for a majority in the National Assembly, his better-than-expected results mean he should have no problems forming a government with a handful of small coalition partners.

One of the first tasks for Khan, once he forms the government, will be to avert a currency crisis, which follows four devaluations of the rupee currency since December, and will likely require Islamabad to seek Pakistan's second International Monetary Fund bailout since 2013.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies