The government is introducing a series of laws to regulate life in migrant-heavy neighbourhoods it labels as ghettos, but some residents feel it is another push to make them feel less at home in their own country.

Danish
Danish "ghettos" are neighbourhoods with large immigrant populations who feel increasingly alienated with the introduction of new laws. (TRT WORLD screen shot) (TRTWorld)

In Denmark, the government classifies certain residential areas as ghettos.

These are neighbourhoods that have large immigrant populations, among other qualifiers.

The government is introducing a series of laws in 2018 to regulate life in those communities, including more policing, with the eventual aim of eliminating "ghettos" altogether. 

However, residents feel it is another push to make them feel less at home in their own country. Many don't consider the tower blocks they live in to be ghettos at all. 

"More and more people feel that the society and the government don't want us to be a part of Danish society‚" Muhammad Aslam, the Mjolner Park residents association chairman, says.

TRT World's Natalie Poyhonen reports from Copenhagen.

Source: TRT World