Students at an international school full of refugees in Tel Aviv say the Israeli government’s deportation policy could affect them and their families in a negative way.

In this February 28, 2011 file photo, a child of African migrants plays outside the Bialik-Rogozin school in Tel Aviv, Israel.
In this February 28, 2011 file photo, a child of African migrants plays outside the Bialik-Rogozin school in Tel Aviv, Israel. (AP)

Bialik Rogozin is a school in the Israeli capital Tel Aviv with no Jewish children; all students are from refugee families.

Fifty-one nationalities are represented in the school while Hebrew, English, Spanish, Russian, Arabic and Tigrinya are also taught.

Around 70 percent of the students in the school have no official status in the country and face deportation as Israel's government takes a hard line on its refugee policy, even with students.

So far, it wants just single males with no dependents out of the country, but there are concerns that is only the beginning.

"I love education, and I like mathematics. I think I would like to be a doctor in the future. An important doctor," says 15-year-old Jordan Bahabolom from Eritrea.

TRT World ’s Iolo ap Dafydd visited the school and has this report.

Source: TRT World