Lebanon splits power among religious groups where the president is always a Maronite Christian, the prime minister a Sunni Muslim and the parliament speaker a Shia.

Girls walk past pictures of Lebanese parliament candidates in Beirut, Lebanon May 2, 2018.
Girls walk past pictures of Lebanese parliament candidates in Beirut, Lebanon May 2, 2018. (Reuters)

The people of Lebanon head to the polls on Sunday to choose their parliamentary representatives for the first time in nine years.

The number of seats in parliament are divided equally between Muslims and Christians and a new law has introduced proportional representation. 

The 128 seats are split evenly – 64 for Christians and 64 for Muslims including Druze, with the two halves further divided among 11 total sects. Each electoral district has seats apportioned according to its demographic makeup.

Disagreement over the electoral law was the main reason elections have been delayed three times since 2009.

Critics say the system is extremely complex and risks dividing Lebanon. 

TRT World's Abubakr al Shamahi reports from Lebanon.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies