After seven years of war, many Syrian children may be seeing their homeland for the first time.

In this June 5, 2017 file photo, displaced Syrian children walk outside their family tents at a camp outside Jarablus, Aleppo province, Syria.
In this June 5, 2017 file photo, displaced Syrian children walk outside their family tents at a camp outside Jarablus, Aleppo province, Syria. (AP)

Displaced Syrian families are leaving neighbouring Turkey to return home, as the security situation begins to improve in parts of northern Syria. 

The Syrian border town of Jarablus has changed since it was liberated from Daesh two years ago and thousands are heading back.

Around  250,000 Syrians have already returned to Turkish-controlled areas of Syria, according to Turkey’s Disaster and Emergency Management Authority (AFAD).

“The situation before was really terrible. There was no electricity, we were constantly besieged, and Daesh oppressed the people. Now, the situation has improved:  electricity, water, and the logistical support provided by Turkey. And now there's a big number of displaced Syrians returning home from Turkey,” said an AFAD representative.

TRT World’s Oubai Shahbandar has more on life in Jarablus.

Held by Daesh until August last year, Jarablus was easily recaptured by the Free Syrian Army supported by Turkey's military on the first day of Operation Euphrates Shield.

The operation was launched by Ankara on August 24 with the aim of clearing terrorist groups along its border with Syria.

Operation Euphrates Shield secured around a 100-kilometre stretch along the border. 

It then moved south to Al Bab, previously a Daesh stronghold.

Turkish troops are still stationed in all secured regions in northern Syria and along the border.

Source: TRT World