Turkish Vice President Fuat Oktay says the main determinant of Libya's future is international law.

Libyan protesters attend a demonstration to demand an end to Khalifa Haftar's offensive against Tripoli in Martyrs' Square in central Tripoli.
Libyan protesters attend a demonstration to demand an end to Khalifa Haftar's offensive against Tripoli in Martyrs' Square in central Tripoli. (Reuters)

International law will determine Libya's future, Turkey's vice president said on Wednesday.

"Putschists should know that it will be on the legitimate basis of international law that will determine the future of peace in Libya," Fuat Oktay said on Wednesday.

With Tripoli's "decisive stance" and Turkey's support, all "games and traps have been thwarted," he added, speaking at a ceremony at Yozgat in central Anatolia.

Oktay said Turkey would back "its Libyan brothers until peace, tranquillity and justice are established in the country."

He emphasised that those who "could not propose any approach towards resolution" to the conflict between the war-torn country's internationally recognised government and renegade general Khalifa Haftar are beginning to "make noise" as Haftar began to lose territory.

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Libya has been torn by a civil war since the ouster of late ruler Muammar Gaddafi in 2011. The country's new government was founded in 2015 under a UN-led agreement, but efforts for a long-term political settlement failed due to a military offensive by Haftar's militias.

The UN recognises the Libyan government headed by Fayez al Sarraj as the country's legitimate authority as Tripoli battles Haftar's militias.

The government had launched Operation Peace Storm last March to counter Haftar's attacks on Tripoli and recently liberated strategic locations including Tarhuna, his final stronghold in western Libya.

READ MORE: How many times has Haftar broken peace initiatives in Libya? 

Source: AA