Top US diplomat Blinken's statement comes after Turkiye's Foreign Minister Cavusoglu said that Ankara and Yerevan will appoint special envoys soon to discuss normalising relations.

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said Washington welcomes Turkiye and Armenia appointing special envoys to discuss normalisation.
US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said Washington welcomes Turkiye and Armenia appointing special envoys to discuss normalisation. (Reuters)

The US has welcomed the current initiatives by Turkiye and Armenia to start discussing steps to normalise relations.

“We welcome and strongly support statements by Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Armenia on appointing Special Envoys to discuss the process of normalization,” US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said on Wednesday.

Foreign Minister of Turkiye Mevlut Cavusoglu said on Monday Ankara and Yerevan will appoint special envoys soon to discuss steps to normalise relations.

Later, Vahan Hunanyan, a spokesperson for the Armenian Foreign Ministry, welcomed the Cavusoglu’s announcement, according to Public Radio of Armenia.

“In this regard, we positively assess the statement of the Turkish foreign minister on the appointment of a special representative for the normalisation of relations, and confirm that the Armenian side will appoint a special representative for this dialogue,” the broadcaster reported, citing Hunanyan.

He noted that Armenia is ready for the normalisation of relations with Turkiye without preconditions.

On Monday, speaking to lawmakers in Turkiye's parliament, Cavusoglu noted that Turkiye would move in coordination with Azerbaijan on the normalisation steps with Armenia.

“In the Caucasus, we are making intense diplomatic efforts to build regional peace and prosperity along with Azerbaijan,” Cavusoglu said.

"In the coming period, we will start charter flights between Yerevan and Istanbul," he added.

READ MORE: Erdogan: Turkey may open borders if Armenia takes positive steps for peace

Deadlock after 2009 accord

Armenia and Turkiye signed a landmark peace accord in 2009 to restore ties and open their shared border after decades, but the deal was never ratified and ties have remained tense.

During the Karabakh conflict last year, Ankara supported Azerbaijan and accused Yerevan of occupying Azerbaijani territories.

The conflict ended in November 2020 in a Russia-brokered deal that saw Armenia cede swathes of territory it had occupied for decades.

In January, the leaders of the three countries agreed to develop economic ties and infrastructure for the benefit of the entire Caucasus region.

READ MORE: Turkey against narrative of hostility with Armenians: Altun

Source: AA