"Adversarial intelligence services in countries such as Russia, China, Iran, and Pakistan have been hunting down CIA's sources and in some cases turning them into double agents," says New York Times, citing a "top secret" cable.

Some governments have been turning CIA assets into double agents and using them to provide CIA with disinformation, and former officials say Pakistan has shown a marked capacity for doing it.
Some governments have been turning CIA assets into double agents and using them to provide CIA with disinformation, and former officials say Pakistan has shown a marked capacity for doing it. (AFP)

US intelligence agency, CIA, has admitted losing dozens of spies after rival intelligence services of countries like Pakistan, China, Russia and Iran hunted them down, with some of them "killed or captured" or turned into double agents, The New York Times reported. 

The disclosure that a large number of individuals recruited to spy for the US had been killed, captured, or compromised in recent years was made in a top-secret cable obtained by the Times.

The cable was distributed to every CIA station and facility around the world last week, the newspaper reported on Tuesday.

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Pakistan's marked capacity for breaking CIA networks

The memo said the success of other intelligence agencies is due in part to their increasingly sophisticated technologies, including biometric scans and facial recognition tools that have allowed them to track CIA officers and, in some cases, discover the identities of informants.

The memo urged case officers to not only be mindful of evading those technologies, but to also be sure to vet their recruits, and placed a special emphasis on reminding officers that they are underestimating their adversaries.

Former officials who spoke to the Times said the CIA has grown rusty at recruiting informants in foreign governments after spending decades focused on post-9/11 counterterrorism.

Rather than kill or capture US informants, some foreign governments have been turning them into double agents and using them to provide the CIA with disinformation, and the former officials said Pakistan has shown a marked capacity for doing it.

Developing networks in Pakistan has become more important in the wake of the collapse of the US-backed government in Afghanistan, and the Times said, "learning more about Pakistan's ties to the Taliban government and extremist organisations in the region is going to become ever more important."

"As a result, the pressure is once again on the CIA to build and maintain networks of informants in Pakistan, a country with a record of discovering and breaking those networks," it said.

"Similarly, the focus by successive administrations on great power competition and the challenges of China and Russia has meant that building up spy networks, and protecting those sources, is more important than ever," it added. 

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Pakistan 'driving force behind the cable'

"Historic Pakistani success in identifying people working for the CIA was a driving force behind the cable," Washington Post reported, citing "the people familiar with the matter".

The cable wasn't prompted by any new penetration of a spy network "but it underscored concerns that CIA officers may be putting recruitment ahead of basic source-protection techniques", The Post reported. 

Source: TRTWorld and agencies