Progress has been slow on the anniversary of a peace accord signed between FARC rebels and the Colombian government. Although FARC has disarmed, violence is brewing again in former rebel-held territories.

The peace deal between the Colombian government and FARC  rebels was heralded as the best chance in decades to end Latin America's oldest and bloodiest armed conflict. Januar 6, 2016
The peace deal between the Colombian government and FARC rebels was heralded as the best chance in decades to end Latin America's oldest and bloodiest armed conflict. Januar 6, 2016 (AP)

As war-weary Colombia marks the first anniversary of the peace accord's signing on Friday, the hopeful mood has dimmed.

While the guerrillas' guns have been silenced, implementation of the historic deal is flagging, according to several outside observers supporting the peace process. 

Lawmakers are still racing against the clock to meet a deadline for passing key elements of the accord, and violence in areas once dominated by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, is once again on the rise amid a record surge in cocaine production.

Meanwhile, many of the 8,000 guerrillas who disarmed in June appear to have grown disillusioned, with about 55 percent having left the rural camps where they were expected to make the transition back to civilian life, according to the United Nations. 

While the government contends many are just breaking free from the once total control of their former commanders, many fear they could be joining criminal gangs or a dissident FARC movement that has about 1,000 fighters nationwide.

But, as Dimitri O'Donnell finds, peace in the city of Medellin has brought new opportunity for some.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies