Taiwanese firm Johnson Health Tech's "@mirror" uses a 3D camera to monitor user's workouts and give tailored feedback.

Various Johnson Health Tech member Renny Hsiao using smartphone to stream workout content to
Various Johnson Health Tech member Renny Hsiao using smartphone to stream workout content to "@mirror" in Taichung City, Taiwan on December 8, 2020. (Screenshot of AP video)

Taiwanese firm Johnson Health Tech has created a mirror using a 3D camera to monitor user's workouts and give tailored feedback.

"The module detects joints on the human skeleton," explains the company's marketing director Danny Chiang.

"And when users make moves with their hands and feet, or when they turn their body, the computing program determines whether the moves are properly performed."

Johnson Health Tech CEO Jason Lo says "@mirror" helps aid social distancing.

"During the Covid-19, I think the most important is that you don't want to touch other people. And you do not want to share a same space with other people. So, you can use this Johnson @mirror in your private home," he says.

"@mirror" works with smartphones, letting users stream various workout content from a dedicated Johnson Health Tech mobile app.

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Various Johnson Health Tech member Renny Hsiao demonstrating using
Various Johnson Health Tech member Renny Hsiao demonstrating using "@mirror", streamed content and digital instructor in mirror, in Taichung City, Taiwan on December 8, 2020. (Screenshot via AP Video)

Real coach

Chen Chun-hsiu is a baseball player for Taiwanese team Rakuten Monkeys. The team works with Johnson Health Tech.

Chen Chun-hsiu says the mirror is complementary to a real coach when he trains on the baseball field.

"When you work with a (real) coach on the baseball field, you don't really know how to correctly perform certain moves. So, some moves are not correct," he says.

"But this does not happen with '@mirror' because you can see your own moves. You are very sure how to perform a move."

The "@mirror" costs approximately $1,785 and a subscription for various streamed content is priced between $14.25 and $17.82.

"And this mirror can actually help a lot of people, because when you do exercises, you have a lot of different choices, you can dance cardio, then you can use yoga," says Lo.

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Source: AP