A three-member International Crimes Tribunal convicted the defendants on charges of committing murders and engaging in looting, kidnapping and arson in the southwestern city of Khulna.

The convicts’ lawyer said his clients “did not get justice” and that they will challenge the verdict in a higher court.
The convicts’ lawyer said his clients “did not get justice” and that they will challenge the verdict in a higher court. (Reuters Archive)

A court in Bangladesh has sentenced six men to death for committing crimes against humanity during the country’s independence war in 1971.

Five of the convicts were present for the sentencing on Thursday in the capital Dhaka, while one is absconding.

A seventh accused has died since the case was launched in November 2015.

A three-member International Crimes Tribunal convicted the defendants on charges of committing murders and engaging in looting, kidnapping and arson in the southwestern city of Khulna in 1971.

All six were said to be supporters of the now-defunct Convention Muslim League and opposition Jamaat-e-Islami during a months-long war that led to Bangladesh gaining independence from Pakistan in 1971.

The tribunal, set up in 2009, has been criticised by international rights groups for not following fair trial standards.

Abdus Sattar Palwan, the convicts’ lawyer, told reporters that his clients “did not get justice” and that they will challenge the verdict in a higher court.

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Source: AA