Spanish PM Mariano Rajoy rejects the ousted Catalan leader's proposition and said he will speak with the new leaders of the region.

Ousted Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont, centre, and former Catalan Health Minister Antoni Comin, left, gesture as they attend a press conference at the Square Meeting Center in Brussels on Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017.
Ousted Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont, centre, and former Catalan Health Minister Antoni Comin, left, gesture as they attend a press conference at the Square Meeting Center in Brussels on Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017. (AP)

The former Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont called on Friday for talks with his adversary, Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, following snap regional elections that gave pro-independence parties a parliamentary majority.

Rajoy ignored the fugitive leader's direct appeal for a meeting, declaring instead that a "new era based on dialogue" began in the restive region, vowing to speak to its new leaders as long as they don't violate Spain's Constitution.

"I will make an effort to dialogue with the government that forms in Catalonia, but I expect it to stop acting unilaterally and outside the law," Rajoy told a press briefing.

TRT World's Sarah Morice has more from Barcelona. 

Puigdemont, who fled Spain almost two months ago to avoid arrest after going against court rulings and pushing for unilateral Catalan independence, said in Brussels that Thursday's election also opened "a new era" for Catalonia.

At his own press conference, Puigdemont said he was ready to meet with Rajoy without pre-conditions anywhere in the European Union other than Spain.

"More than two million people are in favour of Catalonia's independence," Puigdemont said, referring to the election results.

"Recognising reality is vital if we are to find a solution." he added.

Puigdemont also said that he'd return to Catalonia if the new parliament elected him as regional leader, though the legal protections he would have as an elected leader are unclear.

Rajoy called the snap election after Puigdemont and his followers declared Catalonia's independence in October following a referendum that was deemed illegal by Spanish authorities. 

In response, Rajoy fired the Catalan government that Puigdemont ran and dissolved its parliament. Rajoy has ruled out independence for the wealthy northeastern Spanish region, saying it was unconstitutional.

Acknowledging that unionist parties failed to win a majority on Thursday, Rajoy said the results also underscored the region's diversity.

"It's evident that Catalonia is not monolithic, it's diverse and we should all respect that as a virtue," the prime minister said on Friday in Madrid. He added that he wasn't planning to call early national elections, given the bad results of his own party in the region.

Asked whether he would accept meeting with Puigdemont, Rajoy said he would seek a meeting with Ines Arrimadas, the candidate that won most votes in the election.

Though Arrimadas' pro-Spain Ciutadans (Citizens) collected most votes in the ballot, it was a bittersweet victory for the business-friendly party as the pro-independence parties won most seats in the Catalan parliament.

Puigdemont's Together for Catalonia snared 34 seats in the 135-seat regional assembly, making it the most popular independence party. 

Two other pro-independence parties made up the dominant bloc: the left-wing republican ERC party, which collected 32 seats, and the radical, anti-capitalist CUP, which has four seats.

Rajoy's conservative Popular Party came last with just three seats in what was a major blow to the country's governing party.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies