Athens is one of the cradles of civilisation. But the Greek city has still not provided a place of worship for one of the world's most practised religions.

Muslims attend Eid al Fitr prayers at a mosque in a basement, to mark the end of Ramadan, in the Greek port of Piraeus, near Athens.
Muslims attend Eid al Fitr prayers at a mosque in a basement, to mark the end of Ramadan, in the Greek port of Piraeus, near Athens. (Reuters)

The Greek capital was meant to have its first formal mosque by now, but construction delays make it the only European capital without an official mosque. 

Work was meant to be finished by April 2017, but despite delay after delay, the city government has yet to provide reasons.

When finished, the mosque will be the first to adorn the city since the Ottomans left Athens in 1833.

Anna Stamou is a convert to Islam. She said the mosque would bring Muslims dignity in the city.

"When you go to practise your religion... if you're a Muslim, you go to a basement, if you are Christian then you go to a nice church," Stamou said.

TRT World's Caitlin McGee has more from the Greek capital. 

Source: TRT World