French media have speculated that French President Emmanuel Macron obtained ex-president Nicolas Sarkozy's endorsement after offering political influence in return.

Sarkozy, 67, is France's last conservative president and is still seen as an influential figure in the centre-right Les Republicains party.
Sarkozy, 67, is France's last conservative president and is still seen as an influential figure in the centre-right Les Republicains party. (AP)

French President Emmanuel Macron has denied that there was any wider political agreement with former conservative president Nicolas Sarkozy over his endorsement of Macron ahead of a second round of the presidential election on April 24.

French media have speculated that Macron, who will need a new majority after legislative elections later this year following the presidential vote, obtained Sarkozy's endorsement after offering political influence in return.

"There was no agreement," Macron told France 2 television on Wednesday, a day after Sarkozy endorsed him. 

Macron is facing a tight race against far-right candidate Marine Le Pen.

Sarkozy's endorsement will help Macron attract voters who backed the conservatives' candidate Valerie Pecresse in the first round of the election, but it could also deter left-wing voters who will see it as confirmation that Macron is as right-wing as Sarkozy.

Sarkozy, 67, is France's last conservative president and is still seen as an influential figure in the centre-right Les Republicains party.

However, the very existence of Les Republicains now appears under threat after many of its voters backed Macron or Le Pen in Sunday's first round.

READ MORE: Macron, Le Pen start French presidential runoff campaigns after first round

New political alliances 

Macron also said on Wednesday he was ready to forge new political alliances in order to continue reforming France.

"The fractures we have in the country will require me not only to obtain a majority but also to rally all those political forces behind me that don't totally share my views on all topics but would be open to work with me on some reforms," Macron said.

"I'm not talking about coalitions," he added, saying that such cross-party arrangements were not suitable for France's presidential political system.

READ MORE: Voters hope next French president will reunite country

Source: TRTWorld and agencies