Somalia has been engulfed in violence since dictator Mohamed Siad Barre was toppled in 1991. Security has improved in recent years, and so has Somalia's economy.

Less than a year since its launch, the Dhaweeye taxi app has created almost 2,000 jobs It has more than half a million users in four Somali cities and the drivers are screened and trained by the app developers
Less than a year since its launch, the Dhaweeye taxi app has created almost 2,000 jobs It has more than half a million users in four Somali cities and the drivers are screened and trained by the app developers (TRTWorld)

Somalia had been at war for decades, but now life is returning to normal in Mogadishu.

Entrepreneurs and returning Somalis are capitalising on relative peace to start new businesses.

Less than a decade ago, no businesses were interested in starting up in Somalia, but that began to change in 2011, when Al Shabab militants retreated from Mogadishu.

And this year, the World Bank says the economy is projected to grow annually by 3 to 4 percent.     

Economists say better transportation is crucial for that growth to continue.

One company, the Dhaweeye taxi app, is keen to expand to other cities, and business leaders hope it'll help drive Somalia's economic growth.

TRT World's Iolo ap Dafydd reports.