Thousands of people are facing stigmatisation in their own community as they were affected by deadly Ebola pandemic in 2014.

This October 21, 2014 file photo shows a man suffering from Ebola virus lying on the floor outside a house in Port Loko Community, situated on the outskirts of Freetown, Sierra Leone.
This October 21, 2014 file photo shows a man suffering from Ebola virus lying on the floor outside a house in Port Loko Community, situated on the outskirts of Freetown, Sierra Leone. (AP)

The 2014 Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone had devastated the entire community, but years later some of those who survived the deadly pandemic are now struggling with a new foe - discrimination.

The stigma and discrimination in the country is so severe that some Ebola survivors have to leave their own neighbourhood while children are even forced out of school and play.

"When my family died, I tried to go to the stream to fetch some water but people there didn't let me. They didn't allow me to talk and play with people. And so I had to start sleeping in the street.” says 16-year-old orphan Issa Kamara.

TRT World’s Caitlin McGee reports from Sierra Leone's capital Freetown.

Source: TRT World