If the referendum is ratified, Cubans will see a restructured government and a new constitutional order in tune with the country's current times.

Old American cars drive near a government's campaign billboard encouraging to vote for the Constitution in Havana, on February 13, 2019.
Old American cars drive near a government's campaign billboard encouraging to vote for the Constitution in Havana, on February 13, 2019. (AFP)

More than 8 million Cubans are expected to go to the polls on Sunday to vote on a new constitution, which could shape the country's economic, social and political future.

A final draft of the new constitution was adopted by the Cuban parliament last December. 

Luis Estrada, a student at the University of Havana, is keen to vote.

 "I'm studying law and I understand almost all the articles. I agree with the majority of them and I'll be voting 'yes'," says Estrada.

Ed Augustin brings more from capital Havana.

The new constitution is expected to establishes important changes including the recognition of owning private property on the island.

The referendum also includes changes in the government structure, introduces presidential age and term limits as well as social and economic rights.

Local election authorities did a trial run last weekend to ensure there would be no problems ahead of Sunday's vote.

If the referendum is ratified, Cubans will see a restructured government and a new constitutional order in tune with the country's current times.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies